Yakarinta

I generally don’t do many Panoramas, this is probably the first in a very long while, but there was this vista before me, and I wanted to remember it.

This is a combination of 17 individual portrait oriented images, they were taken from left to right, from the hill overlooking Charlie’s Place at Yakarinta.


Yakarinta 16-1875-1891  |  Composite Panoramic Image of 17 individual images

Canon EOS 6D, Canon 24-105 L  |  2016


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery


Land of Many Waters

I recently saw (again) a panorama of Kaieteur that James Broscombe had done, and I remember the one I had done with a Canon PowerShot S5 IS, point and shoot, so I went to look for it and upload it to my page.  It’s the one seen here:

Seeing James’ panorama also reminded me that I was meaning to write this post and share with whoever might stumble across it.

I had the distinct pleasure of meeting Sarah and James Broscombe a few years ago, Sarah was working in remote areas of our country with some of the Amerindian communities and James seemed to tag along camera in hand 🙂

These two talented people made quite an impression on me, and on most (if not all) people who they’ve met and interacted with.

Whatever their initial intent on coming to Guyana, the mark they’ve left on me was most likely not in the original plans… and I daresay there are others who may feel the way I do.

I was introduced to Sarah through her blog, one that she kept as a record of her “adventures” here, what struck me about her writing was the clarity of expression, and the vividness with which I could visualise everything she described.  Her grasp of the English language and her ability to use it to reach across miles of terrain and to describe the nuances of a culture that engulfed her made her writing a compelling read for me.

But this post is more about the work of her husband, James.  James dealt not with the expression of the written word, but with the capturing of scenes from their stay in photographs.  From the streets of the capital to the trails of the Rupununi, he captured an amazing array of cityscapes, landscapes, portraits and other scenes.  His amazing panoramas are breath-taking in the book, so I can only image what they’d look like printed large.  His, now iconic, photograph of lighting over Kaieteur is featured alongside many photographs that showcase the life of the Amerindian communities they spent time in.

The book is titled “Guyana: Land of many waters”, and although t can’t cover everything, it covers more than any other book of its kind.  As a book of photographic work it is packed, no, it is crammed full of beautiful imagery.  The only thing that could have made this book better would have been short stories written by Sarah.   Although I’ve seen most or all of the images online in his blog, it was so much more satisfying to turn leaf by leaf through the book!

If you are Guyanese, or love Guyana, or even just love photography, this is a boo to own, and at that price, it is a steal considering the sheer magnitude of its content.   The book is available here, and below I’m putting some samples I think may peak your interest even more.

The cover alone, should make you want to delve into it  🙂


Pages 24 and 25


Pages 58 and 59


Pages 124 and 125


and the Back Cover, the amazing image of Lightening over Kaieteur


At the list price, James isn’t making any kind of profit, so I suggest you get one before he changes his mind about that price  🙂  Get your copy of “Guyana – Land of Many Waters”, you won’t regret it.

Also visit James’ website over at http://jmbphotography.co.uk/


A Good Photo

For my Deck Photo last week I used a black and white image of a bird walking across a wet expanse, one of my friends and fellow photographers told me that she didn’t like the photo, because it made her feel sad and lonely

When she told me that she didn’t like the photo, I was a little disappointed to tell the truth, but when she told me that it was because it made her feel sad and lonely, I was elated.


One of the things that makes a good photograph is the conveyance of some sort of emotion to the viewer.  For most photos, we look at them and move on, it was a photo of a sunset, or a flower, or an insect, or a door, or a building, or a bird, or any other subject you can think of, but when someone can say that a photo of mine made them reminisce or feel happy or sad, of any other emotion, then I feel that the photo was not only good, but better than I’d hoped for.


Each photo has the potential to reach past the optics of the viewer and into their emotions, when it does, then the photo was worth taking, it was worth the pixels that were spent on it, and the time it took to take and process.

None of these photos are new, but each one has had an emotive response from a viewer, it may not do it to everyone, but to me, that is what makes photography a challenge, to reach into as many of the viewer’s hearts as possible, but to even reach one, is usually enough for me.

As usual, click on the images to see them in their respective Galleries in the Collection.

2011 Deck – Week 33

I had mentioned to someone that it has been a while since I tried a Panorama, or a panoramic image, so when I was with a few other photographers on a visit to the Stabroek Clock Tower, I decided to try one (or two).

Before I go farther, I thought I’d share a bit of information that I have.  I was once told (someone can help verify this) a few facts about the Stabroek Market building; the name comes from the area in which it is located, Stabroek, which is a Dutch name in origin, it was commissioned and erected by the British when they ruled Guyana (then British Guiana), and was bought or sourced from an American company out of the United States.

OK, back to the point of this post, the photo.  I took a sequence of photos starting from the North (my left) and panning right, this Panorama is comprised of seventeen (17) images, each taken in portrait orientation.

I forgot to do any correction for lens distortion prior to combining the images, so there is some chromatic aberration when viewed actual size.  I used Photoshop to combine the images, and minor processing in Lightroom.

Georgetown from the Stabroek Tower

Evening Approaches – Panorama

It’s been a while since I touched a Panorama, or a stitched image  🙂  This one is old (last year) but I never got around to stitching and processing it until now.  Originally intended as a six image Panorama, it seems the last two in the sequence refused to be stitched in (I may try a different software later) so I ended up with a four image stitched together Panorama.

This is from the Roundhouse on the Kingston Promenade on the Georgetown Seawall, facing west, the sun isn’t quite setting but it the exposure gave it a little darkness and added to the mood.  At full size you can see that there are people on the Jetty (pier) in the distance. and even someone on the rocks in the foreground.

 

Evening Approaches - 18mm, 1/320s, f/10, ISO400 - 4 images

I encourage you to click on the image for a better view at the Gallery, but unless you have a very wide monitor, it won’t help too much  🙂  Try this link to see an 1100 pixel wide version.

New Header Image

I was recently reminded that I am primarily a Guyanese photographer (yes, I just referred to myself as a photographer) and that my header image was somewhat inappropriate, it being a panorama from Sint Maarten.

So when Nikhil, Naseem and I went for a drive out West on Saturday, I made a point of trying at least one Panorama image to replace the header with.

The header is cropped to fit the available space in the theme I am using, so I’ve included the original below which you can click on to see larger at the site.

This is a scene of the Conservancy down at the back of Canal Number 1, West Bank Demerara, approaching Sunset and waiting in vain for the colours to get more spectacular.  🙂

 

Conservancy Sunset, 8 image Panorama, 20mm, 1/50sec, f/6.3, ISO200

Panoramas from Sint Maarten and Saint Martin

As I mentioned in previous posts, the island is divided into two portions, I would love to say halves, but I am not one hundred percent sure that the square mileage would be equal.  Anyway, as I was saying, it is divided into two portions, one under Dutch rule and the other under French rule, and in my photo jaunts across the island I actually managed to take photographs for two Panoramas, one in Sint Maarten and one in Saint Martin, so neither side can claim I didn’t do one, right? Right.

That being said, I am no expert on photography, much less Panoramas, but I liked both that I took, they have their appeal and, of course, their faults, but I give them both over for your viewing pleasure (or disgust, whichever label suits you).

In Sint Maarten, the Great Bay is where the Cruise ships filled to overflowing with tourist anchor and dock, there is a roadway that winds its way up the hillside on the opposite side to the area where the ships moor, and there is even a lookout point on that road set aside for viewing the scene.  Because of its vantage point high up in the hills, I needed only take three overlapping photographs to produce a simple panorama of this scene.  Fortunately, there were two cruise ships in the bay that day, so the image has that little extra caveat.

Great Bay, Sint Maarten, Netherland Antilles

I was taken to a spot on the French side that is not frequented by people, my memory fails me a bit here, I think it is somewhere near Baie Rouge (I welcome any clarification).  It was a little late in the afternoon and the sun was setting to my left, so I got a little colour change in the sky, I find that my best Panoramas (that include skies) usually are done nearer to the midday hour.  For this Panorama I wanted to include the shallow waters near the shore as well as the skies, so I took the photographs in portrait orientation mode, this meant more photographs to encompass the view than if I had used a landscape orientation for the camera.  In total I used thirteen (13) photographs for the panorama, and only cropped out a portion to the left that was too much into the afternoon sun.

Near Baie Rouge, Saint Martin, French Antilles

Sometimes one photograph of a scene is not enough to express the feeling that envelopes a person, that’s when you either take a veritable cornucopia of photographs of the large and small items of interest in the scene or you do a Panorama  🙂

I hope you enjoy the images I have shared, please click on them to see them larger (hopefully) at my site.