2014 Deck – Week 14

I am scheduled to do a presentation of some of my select works on October 9th at Moray House (part of the Moray House Trust’s foray into encouraging local photographer to express their vision of their art), and I am very nervous about the whole thing, I am not sure what to say.

I often don’t mind sharing my work, but to talk about it makes me feel queasy; I’m usually afraid I’ll either come off as not knowing what it is I’m talking about, or as being pretentious, trying to pass off what I do as “art”…

But, I’ve committed to it and I’ll either make a complete mess of the whole thing or come out the other end, not much worse for wear 🙂

The title I chose for my Seascape collection is “Oniabo”, an Arawak word meaning water, I’ve decided to use an extended version of this title for this presentation at Moray House, which will include most or all of the 6 photos in the Oniabo series as well as other images at the seawall.

That being said, the photo I offer for this week was one under consideration to be part of that presentation, but was subsequently side-lined.  Although it in no way resembles Hiroshi Sugimoto’s work, it reminded me that Sugimoto’s Seascapes collection is the reason I had decided to begin a Seascape project in the first place,

Sugimoto begins his description of his series like this:

Water and air. So very commonplace are these substances, they hardly attract attention―and yet they vouchsafe our very existence.

My seascapes invariably often include some “land” or earth (a third element?), but this one I titled “Born of Air and Water” as a reminder to myself of Sugimoto’s words.


Canon EOS 60D  |  Sigma 10-20mm  |  10mm, f/4.0, ISO100


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery along with other images from this year’s Deck Project

Advertisements

2014 Deck – Week 13

It really wouldn’t matter what photos I took during week 13 of this year, I’d still choose this one.  I could have gotten a spectacular milky way shot, or the best Kaieteur photo ever, even if I had captured the perfect Cock-of-the-rock photo, or gotten the chance to do a photo shoot of Bon Jovi, I’d still choose this one.

We welcomed our second daughter into our family, so I‘ll just stop jabbering and show you the photo I chose, although many of you might have already seen it on Facebook 🙂


Canon EOS 60D  |  Canon EF 40mm  |  1/60s f/2.8 ISO200


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery.

Reflecting on Riverside

If I remember correctly, this is probably my very first blog post that does not feature a photograph of mine.

This post is about a photograph, a photographer, a poet, a son of Guyana’s soil  –  but since it’s my blog, there has to be something of mine here…

Guyana has not had many famous photographers, and when I say famous, I mean one whose name is practically a household name locally.  On the international scene, we struggle, because we struggle locally to be recognized.

One local name that has always been associated with beautiful photography of Guyana’s natural beauty is Robert J. Fernandes (or as he is better known, Bobby Fernandes), his works have appeared in numerous publications, including his own books, and he has had more than a few exhibitions of his photography at the National Art Gallery at Castellani House..

I was doing some prepress work for him for his most recent book, and the photograph he used for the cover took me back to my childhood.  It was a photo that I had seen in print at various stages of my life; I cannot remember the first time, but it was likely on a calendar when I was probably in primary school.  I attended Saint Stanislaus’ College as my secondary school (Bobby Fernandes’ Alma Mater), and at the school’s office there hung a large print of it.

After leaving that institution I don’t recall seeing it for many years, until I attended an event at Moray House and saw a small print on the wall, I instantly recognized it, and pointed it out to Nikhil.

His most recent book is a book of poetry titled “The Voice and Vision of Robert J. Fernandes”, the first section uses many of his photographs that have also inspired poems, among these is the image I refer to with a poem titled “Riverside”.

Below is an image of the cover:

Voice_and_Vision


The book is available at Austin’s Book Store, it is a collection of poems that are truly Guyanese, beautifully written by one of our very own.


This is my poem that was inspired by his photo and the book:

REFLECTIONS ON RIVERSIDE

The day wanes on the river,
the waters gurgle,
and the crickets signal
the end of another day.
Kissed by the sun,
the sky glows in the west
giving shape
to the distant mountains.
The trees cast shadowed reflections
on the rippled waters
as the boat glides,
softly paddled.
In the cooling waters
the cayman prowl
and the arapaima roll
each seeking night’s shade.
An obstruction appears
some distance ahead,
remnants of a tree
from the waters,
From the photographer’s seat
a click you hear,
the trace of a smile
beneath the hat’s brim.
in later years,
iconic,
that single click;
that light on film…
And then one day
as Sunset comes
it would be the face
of his Voice and Vision.


While I dabble in some poetry, I never think that my pieces are worthy of anything but a casual read, before presenting this piece, I asked the opinion and assistance of the famous singer-songwriter Dave Martins (of the Tradewinds), and he willingly gave me advice, I am very thankful for men like Bobby Fernandes and Dave Martins, who, icons and artists in their own fields, would listen to and willingly give advice to myself and others who ask…

I recently was expressive of my gratitude to my former English teacher Ms Hazel Moses, for her hard work, allowing me to be expressive without too many mistakes in my writing 🙂

She also just released a book of Poetry, for young children, which I encourage you to buy for your children, or young relatives and friends.  It is titled “Playing with Words”; it is available at Austin’s Book Store as well as on Amazon.com

playing_with_words


Today is International Literacy Day; read a book, give a book, and support our local authors.