Land of Many Waters


I recently saw (again) a panorama of Kaieteur that James Broscombe had done, and I remember the one I had done with a Canon PowerShot S5 IS, point and shoot, so I went to look for it and upload it to my page.  It’s the one seen here:

Seeing James’ panorama also reminded me that I was meaning to write this post and share with whoever might stumble across it.

I had the distinct pleasure of meeting Sarah and James Broscombe a few years ago, Sarah was working in remote areas of our country with some of the Amerindian communities and James seemed to tag along camera in hand 🙂

These two talented people made quite an impression on me, and on most (if not all) people who they’ve met and interacted with.

Whatever their initial intent on coming to Guyana, the mark they’ve left on me was most likely not in the original plans… and I daresay there are others who may feel the way I do.

I was introduced to Sarah through her blog, one that she kept as a record of her “adventures” here, what struck me about her writing was the clarity of expression, and the vividness with which I could visualise everything she described.  Her grasp of the English language and her ability to use it to reach across miles of terrain and to describe the nuances of a culture that engulfed her made her writing a compelling read for me.

But this post is more about the work of her husband, James.  James dealt not with the expression of the written word, but with the capturing of scenes from their stay in photographs.  From the streets of the capital to the trails of the Rupununi, he captured an amazing array of cityscapes, landscapes, portraits and other scenes.  His amazing panoramas are breath-taking in the book, so I can only image what they’d look like printed large.  His, now iconic, photograph of lighting over Kaieteur is featured alongside many photographs that showcase the life of the Amerindian communities they spent time in.

The book is titled “Guyana: Land of many waters”, and although t can’t cover everything, it covers more than any other book of its kind.  As a book of photographic work it is packed, no, it is crammed full of beautiful imagery.  The only thing that could have made this book better would have been short stories written by Sarah.   Although I’ve seen most or all of the images online in his blog, it was so much more satisfying to turn leaf by leaf through the book!

If you are Guyanese, or love Guyana, or even just love photography, this is a boo to own, and at that price, it is a steal considering the sheer magnitude of its content.   The book is available here, and below I’m putting some samples I think may peak your interest even more.

The cover alone, should make you want to delve into it  🙂


Pages 24 and 25


Pages 58 and 59


Pages 124 and 125


and the Back Cover, the amazing image of Lightening over Kaieteur


At the list price, James isn’t making any kind of profit, so I suggest you get one before he changes his mind about that price  🙂  Get your copy of “Guyana – Land of Many Waters”, you won’t regret it.

Also visit James’ website over at http://jmbphotography.co.uk/


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