Awry

Some photos have a way of leaving you feeling unsettled, or just not quite right…


Awry 15-9930  |  Lusignan, East Coast Demerara, Guyana  |  2015


Click on the image to see it along with others in the Black and White Gallery.


Advertisements

Shaanti

 

A walk on the sea,

Adrift on a wayward cloud,

Awash in sunlight.


Click on the image to see it in the Collection along with others in the Black and White Gallery.

2015 Deck – Week 48

The photo did not come out as I had hoped, despite several efforts with the phone, and even though my DSLR was sitting right there, I had my mind so set on an Instagram photo for this one that I never even took a photo of it with the DSLR.

This was probably a case of a smartphone without a smart user, I just could not get the focus right, no matter how hard I tried, and I tried, many times….   but I still like the concept of the shot.


Blue  |  Instagram  |  Samsung Galaxy S5 Mini Duos


I was sitting at the table, and barely noticed this little battery sitting on the glass table-top, I tried very hard with the phone to get the battery in focus while keeping the wall and its reflection on the table-top as a background…  but nothing I did would keep the battery in focus long enough for me to click  🙂


2015 Deck – Week 43

This was one of those photos when you’re very glad you noticed the subject/scene and that you had a phone handy that had a decent camera built-in.

I suppose the “not-so-fast” fast food service helped by giving me the opportunity to sit and wait, and in waiting notice the shot 🙂


Menu  |  Instagram  |  Samsung Galaxy S5 Mini Duos


There I was, sitting at a table in the fast-food delivery section of the New Thriving Chinese Restaurant on Main Street, when I noticed the reflection of the backlit Menu on the glass table top, pretty much could not resist taking the photo.

Click on the image to see it in the Gallery

2015 Deck – Week 30

One bad thing about Georgetown is that it floods…. as a photographer, I can also say that one good thing about Georgetown is that… it floods!  That sometimes makes for an interesting photo.

I only had my phone on my at this point, so it was a quick snap to get what I was seeing… and even so I had to crop for an interesting photo, which makes it a bit on the low resolution side.


Samsung Galaxy S5 Mini Duos  |  Instagram


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery.

2015 Deck – Week 28

I’m about to mention some things of which I am quite ignorant about, so anyone wishing to clarify, extrapolate, correct or otherwise educate me on it are welcome to do so.

I usually like to say something about the photo I am presenting, so here goes:

On the coast of Guyana, we see large shipping vessels (trawlers) heading out to sea for fishing, some smaller boats do so closer to shore (but often out of sight us of land), we see men (and women) cast-net fishing, we see some fishermen using rods and lines, and there are likely more methods than I know of, but one type was explained briefly to me because of a photo I took in which I was trying to identify the craft/vessel/device being used by the fisherman, this was the pin seine method.

Pin Seines are usually about 6 feet high and vary in width, the seine or fishing net usually carries a mesh size of three and a half inches or less; the seines are usually pinned to vertical stakes/poles, they are set up at high tide in the intertidal zone (between the tide lines/marks).  When the tide ebbs, fish are trapped in the nets and retrieved by fishermen.

One method of retrieval is by using what is locally called a catamarang, not to be confused with the more stylish catamaran.  The catamaran is a double hulled boat, while the only resemblance to the “double” part that I’ve seen on catamarangs has been the two long boards lashed/secured together forming the base of the vessel.  The catamarang basically consists of the wooden base which is about  14 to 18 inches wide by about 7 to 9 feet long (I haven’t measured one as yet), with a central wooden box the width of the base by about 2 feet long and about 12 to 18 inches deep (high).  It is operated by the fisherman kneeling or standing with one leg upon the base and pushing across the mud with the other leg, the central box is used to store the catch.

Seeing them skim across the top of the water/mud is usually impressive to me, probably because I’d be afraid to try it myself.

All that just to show you a photo of a fisherman returning to shore with his catamarang (and a few fish that are unseen) under a dappled sky.


Canon EOS 60D | Sigma 10-20mm  |  1/160s, f/9, ISO100


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery.