Expressions

Shooting in the streets can be a hit and miss form of photography, especially when you’re doing it “on the move” like I do.  I know many Street Photographers sit and wait for things to happen, and these result in some extraordinary images.  I tend to take photos on the street while I’m walking, either to a particular destination or just walking like a rabid dog in the midday sun (the words of the song go “Mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun…”, and since I’m not an Englishman, I must fall into the Mad Dog category)

On this particular day, as I walked beneath the midday sun, I took maybe about 19 photos during the space of a half hour, I think a normal day I’d get a lot less.  Of these 19, I had set aside 4 keepers and a possible two others for later consideration.  Of the four, one I posted directly to Facebook, another I gave over for use in a poetry blog, and of the remaining two, I had one that I thought was quite the catch in terms of Street Photography.

I was very happy with the overall capture, but more so of the expressions on the faces of the people within the frame, I hope you enjoy it, click on the image to see it in the gallery along with other images “In the Streets”


Soft

In the initial stages of trying my hand at photography, while looking at the images offered online and in books, ones by recognised photographers in their respective fields, I always had it in mind that a good photograph had to be perfect, technically perfect and sharp as a tack.  Of course, the images I was admiring were landscapes, portraits, architectural images and the like.

I later discovered (much much later) that what was more important was capturing the scene, with whatever you have, and however you can; if you can get it perfect, good for you, but it was more important to not lose the moment.

This image I had taken back in 2011, but because of the slight motion blur, I relegated it to the unprocessed pile; and since Street Photography was not my calling, but a way to experiment and even capture moments, it didn’t seem too important at the time.   I was hunting through an old catalog for some images that a friend wanted, and I came across the image and realised I liked it, I can live with the blur caused by a low shutter speed and a hastily snapped image, because that moment is now gone, but I have something to show for it; while it may not be a technically perfect shot, I realise that I don’t really need anyone but me to like it.  🙂


Canon EOS Rebel T1i, Tamron 18-270  |  Georgetown, Guyana, 2011


This was taken during the renovation works to the old Central Garage building on Avenue of the Republic, which is now a series of smaller retail stores.  In Guyana, we call those carbonated beverages “soft drinks”, the ones Americans fondly call Soda.

Click on the image to see it in the Gallery.


Joyride

Growing up in Guyana, a joyride meant what it sounded like, jumping on a bicycle/ motorcycle and going out for a ride with friends and having fun, but it seems that up north it means and meant a completely different thing… I guess we were wrong.


Joyride – 16-1823  |  Canon EOS 60D, Sigm 10-20mm  |  2016, Lusignan, E.C.D, Guyana


Click on the image to see it in the “Out and About” Gallery, a rather quirky collection of images.


2015 Deck – Week 47

Between trying not to get run over on the busy East Bank Public Road, heeding the warnings from the workmen that I was in their way, and trying to get to my vehicle across the now doubly busy road, I was also trying to get a good photo.  This was one of those occasions when you can see the finished photo in your mind’s eye, and as you click the button you’re just praying that it comes up to scratch.

It’s not as sharp as I’d like, but since I was on the move, I’m happy with what I did get 😀


Men at Work 15-0401  |  East Bank Public Road, Providence.


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery.


2015 Deck – Week 18

I’m not a street photographer, far from it, I am not only very hesitant to engage with people on the street, I am also very afraid that when taking candid shots they will see me shooting and think I’m up to something nefarious and then accost me (verbally and physically).  While I like the genre, understand some things about it, try to encourage others into pursuing it, I don’t see myself excelling at it at any time.

While there are times when I am afraid to take a photo of people as they go about their daily lives, there are those other moments when the people of Guyana surprise me (whether they mistake me for a tourist or are just in that mood, I don’t know) and they literally ask for their photo to be taken, most times I am still hesitant, but I do sometimes simply swing the camera in their direction and shoot.


Georgetown Seawall  |  Seawall Public Road


By the way, that’s a Banks Beer in his hand 🙂

Click on the image to see it in the Gallery

Men at work

Psychologists and psychiatrists make big deals out of “association”…

I saw this scene and thought to myself that the reflective safety vests reminded me of the song YMCA by the Village People, then that led me to thinking about Men at Work, the band that sang “Land Down Under”… do you think the pipes being put “under the ground” is an inference as well?

Don’t know what psychologists or psychiatrists would make of me, but for now I’ll avoid seeing any.  and I should probably avoid the Canje area for a little while too 😀

This isn’t a great photo, but ever since I took it I’ve been thinking that I still like it for some reason… so I finished the processing and uploaded.


Canon EOS 60D, Sigma 17-50mm  |  Uncomposed moving shot.


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery.

Men and Boys

I was originally just going to upload the photo and post a link to Facebook, but then I decided I actually had something to say…

Across the globe things are changing, rapidly in some places, slowly in others.  While everyone is striving for an education and a job that earns a high salary, I think we too easily forget the way of life that actually matters; satisfaction at the end of the day’s work, a ready smile for friends and strangers alike, playtime as well as work-time, and actually caring about another human being.

This photo reminded me that we should pass onto other generations the joy of life, of actually living, and not just the drudgery of daily toil that has no reward but a monetary one.

Work hard, but enjoy the benefits of your labour, be able to say “I did that” with pride and with satisfaction; play easily without the need for satisfaction, but able to enjoy it for what it is, human interaction and the joy of Life; cry for joy and for sadness, because sadness means you were once joyful.

Look towards the horizon, curiosity is a good thing, but remember your roots, remember Home.


Canon EOS Rebel T1i, Tamron 18-270mm  |  1/125s, f/8.0, ISO 200 (46mm)


Click on the image to see it in the “Up East” Gallery (it only has 14 pieces so far) 🙂

Pakaraima Mountain Safari 2012 Pt. 4

Monkey Mountain:  We started the day as per normal, early  🙂

I even managed to get in a few snaps before departing, which is a lot more than I managed in 2009.

A view from the benab, our collapsible bucket in the entrance

A cross on the hill, right nearby is the Catholic Church in the village

Our next stop would be in Tuseneng, below you can see some of the terrain that we traversed on the way there  🙂


At Tuseneng, I was fascinated by the “tools of the trade” that could be seen outside the huts / buildings around the village centre.


After Tuseneng we’d be headed towards Paramakatoi passing through Bamboo Creek on the way, this segment of the drive proved more challenging than originally expected as you can see from the photos below:

Frank Singh


By the time we arrived at Paramakatoi it was nigh on twilight, and Frank sought permission for us to stay there for the nigh, even though our original destination for the day would have been Kato.

Travellers at Sunset

Click on the images to see them larger in the Gallery, especially the trail ones 🙂