Working With Wides

Well, I wanted to say “Playing with a Wide-angle Lens”, but I couldn’t resist the alliteration. 🙂

The word wide is relative, so I’ll describe how I use the terms, these are probably not industry accepted descriptions, so don’t quote me 🙂   Your basic entry-level DSLR usually comes with a kit lens that has a range of focal lengths from 18mm to 55mm, this I consider to be a wide telephoto lens, at the widest end (18mm) you get a nice wide view and at 55mm you get closer to close up of the subject, I consider somewhere around 33mm (on the crop-sensors) to be somewhere around “normal” (mind you, I’ll be talking from the stand-point of an APS-C sensor or crop sensor, a full frame or micro-four-thirds is an entirely different scenario)

Since this is the standard kit lens that most people get, we don’t often see it as wide, so that’s when we go Ultra-wide.

My favourite wide-angle lens (OK, the only one I have in the Ultra-wide category) is the Sigma 10-20mm, this produces pleasing images for me, and I love working with it.  You get some amount of distortion at the wider end (understandable) but this tends to be good in certain circumstances.

Often, in architectural photography, you can use wides and ultra-wides to capture more of the interior, and convey more of the sense of space and more of what encompasses the room.

At other times, you can use them closer to the subject to give an increased sense of distance, even accentuate the distortion by being close (do this with people’s faces, and you’ll get some weird effects)

I used the ultra-wide to capture the corner of this building (New Building Society), along with parts of the sidewalk and sky (and a pedestrian) 🙂

There are many things you can do with a wide, many of which I don’t do, I don’t normally put it right up to people’s faces and click, but I’ve seen those photos, and it’s a neat effect  🙂

What I did in this next image was to use the ultra-wide to adjust the sense of scale, I used a fire-hydrant in the foreground to dwarf a three-story building in the background.  One thing that I liked about this shot was that I didn’t have to worry about electricity wires!

The best way to see what your wide-angle lens or your ultra-wide angle lens can do is to put it on the camera and go have fun.  Sometimes it makes compositions tricky as it tends to include everything, even things you may not want, but like working with any focal-length, it’s up to the photographer to adjust framing and composition for these things.

I mentioned using wide-angle lenses for interior architecture, well I doubt if a tent falls under the category of architecture, but I suspect the engineers who came up with the idea for this tent would appreciate the use of the wide-angle for impact  🙂  And would you look at the view!  🙂


All images above were shot with the Sigma 10-20mm on a Canon body, Click on the images to see them in the Collection along with others in their respective Galleries.


2012 Deck – Week 17

Fortunately for me, during the 17th Week of the year (or starting it, more precisely) was a mass celebrating the opening of the 56th Plenary Meeting of the Antilles Episcopal Conference in Guyana.  Months prior to it, I was asked to help cover the event photographically, specifically the group photograph of the Bishops attending, while I usually don’t do portrait photos, I finally acquiesced to give it a try, and was permitted to call in some help.

I was fortunate to have helping me, for the mass coverage, four other photographers, who volunteered their time and expertise; Troy Parboo, Fidal Bassier, Derek Rogers and Joseph Lewis.  I was truly glad for their assistance as I don’t do “people” and event photography too well, Troy and Fidal have had much experience in these areas and truly came through for me, and Derek Rogers has covered many events for more years than the rest of us combined, he also did my Wedding 🙂  Joseph came with less experience but much eagerness and a good knowledge of the proceedings that was invaluable.

It was agreed upon beforehand that the clergy of the church would prefer to have very few people “gallivanting” around the upper walkways, so I volunteered to be the one doing the running around (okay, I hogged it!)

This week’s deck photo I chose from that set.  After taking a group photo of the Bishops, I ran across the road, hurried through the church and scampered all the way up to an overhead walkway that allowed a very high vantage point (Bishop Francis had expressed a desire to have a photo from up there after I had mentioned the view).

Although I have a liking for many of the others that I took, I chose this one for the Deck, it shows the High Altar of the Cathedral from above, with all the Bishops, Monsignor, Priests, Deacon and Altar Servers.  It also shows a bit of the “Our Lady” altar behind, the passage (to the left) that I took around the altar and the pipes of the old Pipe Organ on the right.

Click on the photo for a better view in the Gallery, also in the album there are a few others from the event that I chose to share.

2011 Deck – Week 16

In keeping with the season of Easter (and just being lazy) I used a photo from Palm Sunday for this week’s Deck photo, I “reserved” two from that day just in case I didn’t get anything else I liked for the week, as it is I haven’t even downloaded what little else I did take, so it’s a good thing I did keep back two.

This one is more in keeping with the period, and is somewhat symbolic.  The photograph was taken early in the proceedings, the lay-ministers had just brought up all the ciboria before the altar, and I took a few snaps of them, this one happened to use as the central ciborium the one from the Sacred Heart parish.  The Church of the Sacred Heart was destroyed by fire on Christmas day in 2004, the building was then 135 years old.  The parishioners long to see the church rebuilt and like Christ, rise to new glory.

Happy Easter folks.

Ciboria

Passion Sunday 2011 – Diocese of Georgetown, Guyana

Sunday past was the celebration of the Passion of Our Lord, Jesus Christ, also known as Passion Sunday or Palm Sunday, a remembrance of the day that Jesus entered the Holy CIty of Jerusalem, the beginning of His final days of ministry upon earth.  This marks the beginning of Holy Week for Roman Catholics; for the past few years the Passion Sunday celebration has been on a grander scale than that of my youth, all the Parishes of the area process to the Church of Our Lady of Fatima, and there the blessing of the Palms take place, thence the procession of all those gathered takes place into the grounds of the GCC Ground, Bourda, once famous for its Cricket matches.

As my sister pointed out to me, this was more a recording of the event rather than a serious attempt at photography, but there still might be a gem or two to be gathered from the day  🙂  I’m still not able to “make time” for the blogging and following up on other blogs, but too many friends and family were waiting for this one, so I just had to get through these photos at least  🙂

Click on the photograph below to go to the gallery for photos of the event.