At Day’s End

I don’t want to be the one telling you a story in words, I want to be the one telling you a story in a photo, but who’s story is it?

Are you seeing and interpreting the scene in the same way I do?  Does it matter?

The photograph as it was taken tells one story, what that story is may be entirely up to the viewer, after I have processed it, there are some subtle and some not so subtle changes to the finished image (not edited, nothing has been taken out or added), in this manner, I hope to direct the line of thinking in a certain way, whether it works or not is another matter, but in this way I am interpreting the scene my way, and lending to it my feelings; how the viewer sees it is still up to the viewer.

Many people take scenes literally, others concoct long tales based on the elements in the frame,  others may just have an emotional reaction but not know precisely why;  if it affects you, then I am happy.


At Day’s End – 14-3289  |  Lusignan, East Coast Demerara  |  2014


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery along with other images in the Black and White Collection.


Awry

Some photos have a way of leaving you feeling unsettled, or just not quite right…


Awry 15-9930  |  Lusignan, East Coast Demerara, Guyana  |  2015


Click on the image to see it along with others in the Black and White Gallery.


Home

Where is your home?  Is it an apartment, a flat, a house, a condo, a boat, a trailer, a bench in the park?  For many, the word home simply means a dwelling place, for me, it is a place where I am comfortable.

My family is my home.

Guyana is my home.

At work, I’m at home.

Certainly, on the seawalls, I am at home.


Home  |  Canon EOS 60D  |  Sigma 10-20mm  |  January 2016


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery

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2015 Deck – Week 28

I’m about to mention some things of which I am quite ignorant about, so anyone wishing to clarify, extrapolate, correct or otherwise educate me on it are welcome to do so.

I usually like to say something about the photo I am presenting, so here goes:

On the coast of Guyana, we see large shipping vessels (trawlers) heading out to sea for fishing, some smaller boats do so closer to shore (but often out of sight us of land), we see men (and women) cast-net fishing, we see some fishermen using rods and lines, and there are likely more methods than I know of, but one type was explained briefly to me because of a photo I took in which I was trying to identify the craft/vessel/device being used by the fisherman, this was the pin seine method.

Pin Seines are usually about 6 feet high and vary in width, the seine or fishing net usually carries a mesh size of three and a half inches or less; the seines are usually pinned to vertical stakes/poles, they are set up at high tide in the intertidal zone (between the tide lines/marks).  When the tide ebbs, fish are trapped in the nets and retrieved by fishermen.

One method of retrieval is by using what is locally called a catamarang, not to be confused with the more stylish catamaran.  The catamaran is a double hulled boat, while the only resemblance to the “double” part that I’ve seen on catamarangs has been the two long boards lashed/secured together forming the base of the vessel.  The catamarang basically consists of the wooden base which is about  14 to 18 inches wide by about 7 to 9 feet long (I haven’t measured one as yet), with a central wooden box the width of the base by about 2 feet long and about 12 to 18 inches deep (high).  It is operated by the fisherman kneeling or standing with one leg upon the base and pushing across the mud with the other leg, the central box is used to store the catch.

Seeing them skim across the top of the water/mud is usually impressive to me, probably because I’d be afraid to try it myself.

All that just to show you a photo of a fisherman returning to shore with his catamarang (and a few fish that are unseen) under a dappled sky.


Canon EOS 60D | Sigma 10-20mm  |  1/160s, f/9, ISO100


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery.

Men and Boys

I was originally just going to upload the photo and post a link to Facebook, but then I decided I actually had something to say…

Across the globe things are changing, rapidly in some places, slowly in others.  While everyone is striving for an education and a job that earns a high salary, I think we too easily forget the way of life that actually matters; satisfaction at the end of the day’s work, a ready smile for friends and strangers alike, playtime as well as work-time, and actually caring about another human being.

This photo reminded me that we should pass onto other generations the joy of life, of actually living, and not just the drudgery of daily toil that has no reward but a monetary one.

Work hard, but enjoy the benefits of your labour, be able to say “I did that” with pride and with satisfaction; play easily without the need for satisfaction, but able to enjoy it for what it is, human interaction and the joy of Life; cry for joy and for sadness, because sadness means you were once joyful.

Look towards the horizon, curiosity is a good thing, but remember your roots, remember Home.


Canon EOS Rebel T1i, Tamron 18-270mm  |  1/125s, f/8.0, ISO 200 (46mm)


Click on the image to see it in the “Up East” Gallery (it only has 14 pieces so far) 🙂

Fishermen

Third time.

I have no idea why I keep going back to this particular set of images, I’d shot a few frames of these fishermen on a photowalk in 2013, and I realized yesterday I’d now processed three of them…

one was a cover image for my Facebook page, a second one I had processed as a vignetted sepia image (two years ago):

And yesterday, I clicked on one and felt the need to process it in black and white…

Different but similar images, treated differently, tell different stories.


Click on the images to see them in their respective Galleries.


2014 Deck – Week 45

That photo I used for Week 44 was different, yes, I think it’s good, is that what I want to be doing at this time?

So, back to our regular programming…  a high contrast monochrome from the seashore.  I was hoping that the fisherman/sailor would just sit and stare at the sea for a while, at the time I shot this I think he was securing the bow line.

This is a scene that was a no-brainer for me, it had everything I usually want… Jhandi flags, a boat, a fisherman, a good sky and little garbage in sight within the frame 🙂


24mm, 1/1250s, f/5.0, ISO 200


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery along with other images from this year’s Deck Project