Tree on the Canal

As “modern” photographers, many of us share our work online, hoping that we will get recognised, maybe even sought out, it seldom works that way.  One casualty of this online type of photography is the lack of actual physical prints of our work.  There are comparatively few of my images out there, all things considered, but sometimes a few will get out.

One print that remains in my memory is from my very first exhibition, Coastal Wanderings, with Nikhil Ramkarran.  from that exhibition I only “sold” one print, but sales were never my goal, I just wanted to see if people would take my work seriously.  That print was sought after by Mr Colin Edwards of Rockview Lodge in Annai, North Rupununi.

tree on the canal.cdr

Colin has long been a supporter of the arts in Guyana, he has also been an admirer of the works of local photographers including myself.  In the image above, the photo to the right shows a portion of Rockview Lodge, the Kaieteur Falls image under the stairwell is by Nikhil Ramkarran, the black and white to the left as you go up the stairs is mine.  Colin is also part of the team behind the Rupununi Music Festival.

I was reminded of this image recently and thought to offer a special print sale on Metallic Photopaper prints.   For the month of June 2020, I’ll be using the print services available to the site and offering the image at four sizes at a 25% discount.  The high contrast black and white image will be enhanced by the Metallic PhotoPaper print, giving it a finish that you will love.

The image was part of the 2010 Deck Project I did, you can see the image on the site by clicking on the link below:

Tree on the Canal

Before going to the cart, make sure to choose your currency of preference, the coupons are available in US Dollars, Canadian Dollars and British Pounds Sterling.  Depending on your choice of currency, labs in the US, Canada and UK will be automatically chosen to produce the prints.   At checkout use the appropriate coupon code:

In the United States use TREE25US

In the Canada use TREE25CAN

In the United Kingdom use TREE25UK


Thank you everyone, especially those who have supported my journey with their words of encouragement and criticism, both are equally welcome and important to my work.


Supermarket

Supermarkets are usually very busy places, especially during the hours I can shop in them.  During this time when people are trying to practice social distancing, its probably not surprising that I can actually get shots that are not too “busy” 🙂

Wet Floor – 20-0812

Cleaning (and hopefully sanitizing) the shopping environment.


Chill – 20-0810

What caught my attention here was the slight distortion that the cold frosted door caused to the image of the man there as opposed to the clarity of the man beyond the door.


Packing – 20-0822

Tilted images are not my thing, but sometimes they are necessary and sometimes they work.


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Some people can’t leave their children at home, so it becomes necessary to take them into potentially dangerous areas.  Who would have thought that we would ever describe a supermarket as a potentially dangerous area…


Inside supermarkets are not easy to shoot, at least not for me, the lighting is not optimal, being relatively low light, especially in narrow aisles, the diversity of images may not be as ideal as out on the streets, and the space tends to be cramped, luckily, these allowed for some space due to a sparsity of people. 🙂

As you might notice, there is no prevalence of masks, not because Guyanese are conscious of the actual dangers of that, or the possible benefits, but because its not part of our preventative measure, just like staying at home isn’t….

The WHO recently reiterated its position on who should wear masks and when, as always, its about educating ourselves on these things.

Click on the images to see them in the Gallery along with other photographs “In the Streets”.


Around the Block

Yesterday I decided to literally take a walk around the block, just to see how the COVID-19 and its repercussions might be affecting the neighbourhood (my work neighbourhood, that is).   So as not to waste the opportunity, I walked with my DXO camera as well.

As street photography goes, nothing great, but a few decent ones 🙂


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You probably can’t see it, but in that vendor’s section is some Nenwah Husk, used my many a Guyanese as a body scrub.


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Being the lone Chinese walking around I kinda attract unnecessary attention, this lady kept a close eye as I walked by; good thing I didn’t sneeze or cough.


Ras – 20-0785

This rastafarian on crutches carefully made his way along the pavement, but was very observant of all the stalls he passed, might have been looking for Nenwa. 🙂


Mango – 20-0786

In her hand is a bag of sliced green Mango, I can only assume that maybe it also had “loud pepper and salt”


Gyaff – 20-0787

Almost as if COVID-19 were not on our shores, these gentlemen were busy “gyaffing” and the topic as I passed was all politics, aka GECOM-20


Less people than normal during midday, but still enough, and as you can see, not much social distancing occurring.

Click on the images to see them in the Gallery along with other images “In the Streets”


The Mask

Depending on where you source your information from, some places are saying that wearing masks will help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 disease, some are saying the masks won’t help prevent you getting it, but if you have symptoms, then you should wear a mask in public…  regardless, in some places in Guyana, masks are starting to appear with more frequency.

Before I myself am sent into lockdown, I think I’ll keep trying to capture street scenes.


Packing – 20-0736

Many supermarkets, staying open to supply us with our necessities, are mandating that their staff be masked, some are assisting with sanitisers as you enter, one I went into even gave me a mask to wear while in their store.


Inspect – 20-0753

Taking no chances, this Chinese man masks up in the market, probably getting some fresh produce for his restaurant. Some Chinese restaurants have taken to doing Take-Away only, through a window, helping to limit exposure while still serving their customers


Unpack – 20-0756

At a shopping “mall” –  even though this isn’t the sharpest image, I’ve always found that for Street Photography, the story matters more than the technical perfection of the image.


Packing – 20-0758

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Take every precaution possible.  Be informed, beware of fake “cures and remedies”.

Tech giant Google has created a COVID-19 Information and Resource page.

And the World Health Organisation (WHO) is a trusted source of anything health related, including COVID-19, Keep checking their page for Updated information and guidance; here’s a link to their COVID-19 Advice page.

Please desist from spreading via social media (especially WhatsApp, unconfirmed data or things you’ve heard; be informed, be safe, be responsible.

Click on the images to see them in the Gallery, along with other images “In the Streets”


More from Mon repos

In my previous post, I showed what would have been my “select 5”  images from a walk in Mon Repos Market, select as in those I’d choose to enter into the VISIONS Exhibition 2020 (were I to submit).  Today I’d like to share another five images from that walk.

Any place where people are involved with activities of interaction or even just on the move, are places where you can find a treasure trove of Street Photographs  🙂


Easy – 20-0685

Some people make shopping look fun, getting a smile on the face of someone fetching several bags, priceless 🙂


Outer-Roast – 20-0691

These guys are using a blow-torch to sear the outsides of the poultry, never saw this before.


Greens – 20-0693

One of the few that I felt should be left in colour.


Mon Repos – 20-0695

The dynamics around this stall caught my eye, not sure I got what I wanted but I got a decent one either way 🙂


Shade – 20-0711

This lone young girl at this stall right at one of the exits also caught my eye, another angle that I took was better, but the image quality was not, so this one works 🙂


Click on the images to see them in the gallery along with other images “In the Streets”

 


My Rest

With unrest in town since the General and Regional Elections as well as less people in town due to the COVID-19 arrival on our shores, I had a Saturday morning off, and went into the Mon Repos market for a short walk.

Mon Repos is a village on the East Coast of Demerara, not too far before the large Lusignan Village.  Saturday is Market Day at Mon Repos, and while I’ve walked in there a few times, this time I think I came away with a few good shots.  whilst processing them, I couldn’t help but think that if I were submitting images for this year’s intended VISIONS Exhibition 2020, I might actually choose from these.  In that spirit, I went through the ones I had earmarked as keepers and chose five to share,

VISIONS allows  photographers of Guyanese descent or even non-Guyanese who live and work in Guyana, to submit three to five photographs; the photographs should be chosen with a theme in mind, a theme of the photographer’s own choosing.  The submitted photographs are then collected  by the curator (or curatorial panel) and viewed together as an entire collection of images from a variety of photographers, and naturally, there will be a variety of genres as well as themes.  From this collection a narrative (or narratives) emerge, and it is this narrative that the curator works towards telling with the images chosen for the purpose.

Since it isn’t a competition, many excellent images are not included, but be assured that all those that are used are not only well suited to the narrative, but are also exemplary works by the photographers who submitted them.


Packing – 20-0687

Lighter Side – 20-0690

COVID-19 – 20-0697

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Sharp – 20-0717

I’m not much of a Street Tog (photographer), but these would be my picks for VISIONS is I were submitting.  Quite a switch from  my usual seascapes 🙂

To see them in the Gallery “ In the Streets”, click on the images, you’ll see them there along with other images in that Gallery.


Cyclist on the dam

I tend to take photographs with composition in mind, maybe except when I’m trying Street Photography, but other than that, its usually about how the scene shapes up, where the lines go, how much foreground versus background to use, and sometimes, even where the main subject should fall, although that is not always the case.

Because of that approach, and because I seldom think about the “colour” of the image, I tend to see the resulting image in terms of black and white, shades of gray, more about form and function, lines, elements, etc.

These were just some thoughts going through my mind while processing this image:

Cyclist on the dam | 20-6775

At Lusignan its currently more of a dam than a seawall 🙂

Click on the image to see it in the Gallery along with some others from the “Up East” album


Five for the weekend

The powers that be decided to declare Elections Day in Guyana a national holiday, so we have a long weekend.

I decided to share five photos from my last month’s walking about, whether you see anything in them that appeals, or shows diversity, I can say that these show people, the quintessential “man in the street”, or if we’re going to be politically correct, “person in the street”, the people who will be affected by the outcome of Monday’s vote, and any events that may occur because of the elections, the parties and the electorate’s response.   These are the people for whom “life goes on”, regardless of what happens.

Babies Day Out - 20-0528
Babies Day Out – 20-0528

20-0539 | Church St, Georgetown, Guyana

20-0551 | Coconut Vendor on Main Street, Georgetown, Guyana

20-0557 | Robb Street, Georgetown, Guyana

20-0558 | Robb Street and Avenue of the Republic, Georgetown, Guyana

Hope you like one or two of those.  Click on them to see them in the Collection along with many more images  from my album “In The Streets”


Expressions

Shooting in the streets can be a hit and miss form of photography, especially when you’re doing it “on the move” like I do.  I know many Street Photographers sit and wait for things to happen, and these result in some extraordinary images.  I tend to take photos on the street while I’m walking, either to a particular destination or just walking like a rabid dog in the midday sun (the words of the song go “Mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun…”, and since I’m not an Englishman, I must fall into the Mad Dog category)

On this particular day, as I walked beneath the midday sun, I took maybe about 19 photos during the space of a half hour, I think a normal day I’d get a lot less.  Of these 19, I had set aside 4 keepers and a possible two others for later consideration.  Of the four, one I posted directly to Facebook, another I gave over for use in a poetry blog, and of the remaining two, I had one that I thought was quite the catch in terms of Street Photography.

I was very happy with the overall capture, but more so of the expressions on the faces of the people within the frame, I hope you enjoy it, click on the image to see it in the gallery along with other images “In the Streets”


Out There

Some thoughts on the photographic process.

For me, the Photographic Process encompasses several stages, some think of it as simply taking a photograph with a device such as a camera or a phone, but I’d like to just mention the stages that I consider part and parcel of the Photographic Process, all of this just to speak specifically about one part that has to do with some of my black and white images.

The photographic process begins with the Photographer’s Eye, seeing that which is intended to be captured, since we all see things differently, this first part starts the differentiation of one image from the next and “my image” from “your image”.  Secondly, our camera adjustments, for many this is done using the automatic settings, but for others it may entail making several adjustments to modes and setting values for shutter speed, aperture and ISO;  these settings are usually determined by the lighting conditions and the desired “look” of the resulting image.  Next comes the composition, determining what to include in the frame, what to exclude, and a variety of other compositional techniques.  Then we click the shutter button.

In our current digital age, this is usually the end of the process, it gets shared on social media, etc., some may pass the image through a simple software for preset filters etc before sharing.  For photographers, this has only been half the work, the next stage is to process the image, depending upon the ultimate use of the image this can be done in a myriad of ways; for me, I seldom do weddings or portraits, so generally the image is intended as ”art”, yes, it sounds pretentious, but that’s what I usually intend, so I would often process the image through Adobe Lightroom, and for many of my black and white images, I also use DXO Nik Silver Efex for the black and white processing.  Once the image is processed to my satisfaction, it is then shared to my site or to social media.  For me, however, the process ends at another stage, when I actually have the image printed.

Out There - 14-5265
Out There – 14-5265 | Oniabo Lusignan, East Coast Demerara, Guyana | 2014

The size of the printed image is usually limited by a few factors, including the size (usually in megapixels) of the original capture, the content of the frame (composition) and the type of processing done to the image.  Some of my black and white processing can result in things that would not look well if printed large, such as today’s image.  I used a high contrast process and worked to heighten the structure and clarity of the image, in so doing there is a resultant “haloing” in existing high contrast areas of the image, when enlarged this can lend the impression that the image was “edited” that portions were spliced in, when in fact they were not.  So, in short, I most likely would not print this image large, possibly 16” x 24”’ as the largest print, this would retain the integrity of the image for me.

This is not a new photograph, it lay unprocessed in my files since 2014, I went scanning through the archives again this morning and spotted it, wondering why I never processed it (as usual).  It is not the latest addition to the Oniabo Collection.

Click on the image to see it in the Gallery along with other images in the Black and White album.