2015 Deck – Week 39

Today is Roots Day (not the day I took the photo, but the day I am posting it, December 23rd).

Although not a widespread day of observance, it’s probably a good thing for us to look back at who we are, who our parents and their ancestors were, where we’ve come and what has made us who we are today.

We may also want to reflect on these things and consider what we are passing on to the next generation.

That being said, here’s a photo of my youngest daughter… part of the next generation.


Malina | Canon EOS 6D | Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L


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2015 Deck – Week 38

The Jerk Hut

With a name like that I was expecting Jamaicans, from the accent to the food.  Sadly I was disappointed on both counts when I was there.  The grilled fish was good, but with more bones than I like (quite acceptable to most people, I’m just quirky that way), but the Jerk pork was nothing like what I enjoyed in JA.  It seems I must plan a visit to my uncle 🙂  Speaking of which, trips cost mulah, and if you see something on my site you like, don’t hesitate to buy 😀

Anyway, fun aside… this place was RED, from the tent/roof, sides, tabletops, aprons… all RED.  So, it’s not that I overdid it on the photo, it’s just that the place was like that, and the poor phone camera had a hell of a time focusing because of it.  I’m glad I got the shot I did.


The Jerk Hut (Amaro)  |  Instagram  |  Samsung Galaxy S5 Mini Duos


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2015 Deck – Week 35

There are times when you take a photo and know right away that you’ll love it; whether anyone else might, that’s a different question, but so far this one has turned out to be pretty well liked.

For those of us still living here and for many of those Guyanese living abroad… this is probably iconic of some areas of Georgetown.


Cummings’ Street Car Wash  |  Instagram  |  Samsung Galaxy S5 Mini Duos


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2015 Deck – Week 34

I realise that this one might need some context…  which, in the eyes of some, makes it a less successful photograph that it could have been.  Of course, I could just as easily not give context and it could probably be a better photograph for it…

But, I will put in my few words anyway 😀


Canon EOS 60D, Sigma 10-20mm.

Main Street/ High Street, Georgetown.


Basically, I wanted a photo of the pedestrian in the distance with the recently knocked down / destroyed sign in the foreground; the sign that once indicated to drivers and pedestrians that there was a pedestrian crossing ahead.  🙂

But this photo got me to also thinking about the street upon which I took the photo; this portion you see is called High Street, the portion behind me (which is obviously not in the photo) is called Main Street, as you proceed further south it then changes to Avenue of the Republic and then back to High Street.  Why would what is effectively one street have four different named sections?  From what I’ve read, it was possibly once called simply “High Street”; the portion running through Cummingsburg was then named Main Street, and then when Guyana attained Republic status the portion running through Lacytown was renamed to Avenue of the Republic.  Interestingly, after a slight detour around St Saviour’s Church, it becomes Saffon Street, this, however, never seems to be considered as part of the “High Street” issue.

Stretches of streets within Georgetown which have multiple names is normally attributed to the fact that Georgetown was originally built as a number of different wards, and the streets were never meant to be contiguous, then the wards were joined together, the multiple names resulted, along with some streets having a slight turn to continue since the original ones were not in-line.  The wards involved in the High Street issue are Kingston (High Street), Cummingsburg (Main Street), Lacytown (Avenue of the Republic) and Stabroek / Werk-en-Rust – and part of Charlestown (High Street).


Click on the image to see it in the gallery.

2015 Deck – Week 33

I climbed onto the seawall to see what I could photograph, and a voice coming from near my feet surprised me.  This fellow was packing up some items in a bag.   He thought I was a foreigner, but the minute I answered him he realised I was local.

According to him, he has lived along the seawall for most of his life, he doesn’t have a regular job, he does odd-jobs, but he says he finds everything he needs to survive right there on the seawalls.   Although I’m not sure about him finding “everything”, I saw no reason to doubt he finds most of what he needs 😀


Life on the wall 15-0143  |  Georgetown Seawall, Guyana

Canon EOS 60D, Sigma 10-20mm Lens


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2015 Deck – Week 30

One bad thing about Georgetown is that it floods…. as a photographer, I can also say that one good thing about Georgetown is that… it floods!  That sometimes makes for an interesting photo.

I only had my phone on my at this point, so it was a quick snap to get what I was seeing… and even so I had to crop for an interesting photo, which makes it a bit on the low resolution side.


Samsung Galaxy S5 Mini Duos  |  Instagram


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2015 Deck – Week 28

I’m about to mention some things of which I am quite ignorant about, so anyone wishing to clarify, extrapolate, correct or otherwise educate me on it are welcome to do so.

I usually like to say something about the photo I am presenting, so here goes:

On the coast of Guyana, we see large shipping vessels (trawlers) heading out to sea for fishing, some smaller boats do so closer to shore (but often out of sight us of land), we see men (and women) cast-net fishing, we see some fishermen using rods and lines, and there are likely more methods than I know of, but one type was explained briefly to me because of a photo I took in which I was trying to identify the craft/vessel/device being used by the fisherman, this was the pin seine method.

Pin Seines are usually about 6 feet high and vary in width, the seine or fishing net usually carries a mesh size of three and a half inches or less; the seines are usually pinned to vertical stakes/poles, they are set up at high tide in the intertidal zone (between the tide lines/marks).  When the tide ebbs, fish are trapped in the nets and retrieved by fishermen.

One method of retrieval is by using what is locally called a catamarang, not to be confused with the more stylish catamaran.  The catamaran is a double hulled boat, while the only resemblance to the “double” part that I’ve seen on catamarangs has been the two long boards lashed/secured together forming the base of the vessel.  The catamarang basically consists of the wooden base which is about  14 to 18 inches wide by about 7 to 9 feet long (I haven’t measured one as yet), with a central wooden box the width of the base by about 2 feet long and about 12 to 18 inches deep (high).  It is operated by the fisherman kneeling or standing with one leg upon the base and pushing across the mud with the other leg, the central box is used to store the catch.

Seeing them skim across the top of the water/mud is usually impressive to me, probably because I’d be afraid to try it myself.

All that just to show you a photo of a fisherman returning to shore with his catamarang (and a few fish that are unseen) under a dappled sky.


Canon EOS 60D | Sigma 10-20mm  |  1/160s, f/9, ISO100


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery.

2015 Deck – Week 27

My fascination with the seawalls continues.

Almost every weekend, I stop somewhere along the walls… sometimes never taking a photo, just walk along the wall, or to the water’s edge for a few minutes.

Sometimes I take photos that never see the light of day, but sometimes there’s one that falls just into the type of image that I like taking, processing and sharing.


Canon EOS 60D, Sigma 10-20mm  |  10mm, 1/250s, f/11, ISO 100


Click on the image to see it in the Gallery along with other images from this year’s Deck Project